Teen Winter Reads

Teen Services Blog

The weather outside is frightful, but the books you can read are delightful.  Grab a couple of these wintery books to keep you warm this winter.


Let it Snow: Three Holiday Romances by John Green, Maureen Johnson, and Lauren Myracle
In three intertwining short stories, several high school couples experience the trials and tribulations along with the joys of romance during a Christmas Eve snowstorm in a small town.


What Light by Jay Asher
Sierra’s family runs a Christmas tree farm in Oregon–it’s a bucolic setting for a girl to grow up in, except that every year, they pack up and move to California to set up their Christmas tree lot for the season. So Sierra lives two lives: her life in Oregon and her life at Christmas. And leaving one always means missing the other. Until this particular Christmas, when Sierra meets Caleb, and one life eclipses the other.
By reputation, Caleb is not your perfect guy: years ago, he made an enormous mistake and has been paying for it ever since. But Sierra sees beyond Caleb’s past and becomes determined to help him find forgiveness and, maybe, redemption. As disapproval, misconceptions, and suspicions swirl around them, Caleb and Sierra discover the one thing that transcends all else: true love.


The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Four English schoolchildren find their way through the back of a wardrobe into the magic land of Narnia and assist Aslan, the golden lion, to triumph over the White Witch, who has cursed the land with eternal winter.


Stealing Snow by Danielle Paige
Seventeen-year-old Snow has spent the majority of her life within the walls of the Whittaker Institute, a high security mental hospital in upstate New York. Deep down, she knows she’s not crazy and doesn’t belong there. When she meets a mysterious, handsome new orderly and dreams about a strange twisted tree she realizes she must escape and figure out who she really is.

Using her trusting friend Bale as a distraction, Snow breaks free and races into the nearby woods. Suddenly, everything isn’t what it seems, the line between reality and fantasy begins to blur, and she finds herself in icy Algid–her true home–with witches, thieves, and a strangely alluring boy named Kai, none of whom she’s sure she can trust. As secret after secret is revealed, Snow discovers that she is on the run from a royal lineage she’s destined to inherit, a father more powerful and ruthless than she could have imagined, and choices of the heart that could change the fate of everything . . . including Snow’s return to the world she once knew.


East by Edith Pattou
Rose has always felt out of place in her family, a wanderer in a bunch of homebodies. So when an enormous white bear mysteriously shows up and asks her to come away with him–in exchange for health and prosperity for her ailing family–she readily agrees. The bear takes Rose to a distant castle, where each night she is confronted with a mystery. In solving that mystery, she loses her heart, discovers her purpose, and realizes her travels have only just begun.
As familiar and moving as “Beauty and the Beast” and yet as fresh and original as only the best fantasy can be, East is a novel retelling of the classic tale “East of the Sun, West of the Moon,” a sweeping romantic epic in the tradition of Robin McKinley and Gail Carson Levine.

Stork by Wendy Delsol
After her parents’ divorce, Katla and her mother move from Los Angeles to Norse Falls, Minnesota, where Kat immediately alienates two boys at her high school and, improbably, discovers a kinship with a mysterious group of elderly women–the Icelandic Stork Society–who “deliver souls.”

It’s Banned Books Week!

Teen Services Blog

“Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.”- http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

This year Banned Books Week goes from September 25-October 1.  Below are some books that in the past (sometimes present) people have tried to ban others from reading.  Below are a few teen books that individuals (parents, educators, politicians, etc) have tried to take out of libraries and schools.

        

    

Check out this list for more banned or challenged Teen Books.

The American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) compiles lists of challenged books as reported in the media and submitted by librarians and teachers across the country.

Miss Peregrine’s Book Discussion

Teen Services Blog

9.22 miss peregrines

Join us on September 22, 4:30-5:30pm to discuss Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs.  We’ll eat snacks, talk about the book (and how excited we are for the movie) and then make Miss Peregrine inspired tote bags!

Stop in at the library’s reference desk to pick up a copy of the book to check out and make sure to register for book discussion.  You can also register by phone by calling 810.229.6571 extension 227 or email us at britref@brightonlibrary.info

 

 

Teen Book Review: Maximum Ride-The Angel Experiment

Teen Services Blog

Book:Maximum Ride: The Angel Experiment by James Patterson
Reviewer: Anton,Grade 7

Author James Patterson, best known for adult suspense novels, makes a passable foray into the young adult market with this book about a group of human/bird hybrids. For teens who just want action and excitement and who don’t much care about the niceties — such as logic, character development, consistent voice, or plot — this will be plenty of fun. And there’s the fantasy of winged flight, which is always a pleaser. The book
opens up by introducing us to Max, a fourteen-year-old girl who also happens to be a human-avian hybrid. She lives in a house with her fellow hybrid friends—Fang, Iggy, Nudge, the Gasman, and Angel. They used to live at the School, where evil scientists created and experimentmaximumted on them, but they escaped and have been in hiding ever since.The entire book amounts to little more than a prologue to the series: Despite more than 400 pages of chases, fights, break-ins, and almost non-stop action, practically nothing actually happens in this fantasy book. The main characters are captured, they escape, they are cornered, they escape, they are wounded, they recover, they try to hide, they are found, over and over again. In truth, very little of it makes any kind of sense, though there are plenty of hints that it will eventually — just not in this book.
In the end i would rate this book a 3/5 because this book didn’t really capture my attention and didn’t have me coming back to the book.

Teen Book Review: Cinder

Teen Services Blog

Book: Cinder by Marissa Meyercinder-book-cover
Reviewer: Macey, Grade 8

Cinder is a 387 page book that takes place in the futuristic world written by Marissa Meyer. Cinder falls over the category of Sci-fi because of the new and improved technology that is introduced within the series. In this remake of Cinderella the main focus is on a teenage girl named Cinder. Cinder is treated as a misfit that nobody even cares about, including her step-mother and sisters just because she is a cyborg. During the day Cinder runs her own booth at the market as a mechanic. One day she gets an unexpected visitor, the PRINCE!!!! Prince Kai needs her to fix one of his most important robots. Meanwhile a deadly sickness is tearing apart her world. Millions are dying from this contagious plague that still needs a cure. For even more added pressure, the horrifying but gorgeous Luna Queen decides to visit Earth. But something’s up with her visit. Something that Cinder believes has to do with killing.

I’d give this book a 5/5 stars because it is amazing and a need to read for teens and tweens!!!!!! I loved this book because  it kept me at the edge of my seat and never disappointed me with the amount of action and adventure within its 387 pages.

What our Teen Librarian is Reading

Teen Services Blog

Do you love YA books?  Well I do.  As the Teen Services Librarian I’m constantly reading to keep up with our Teen book collection and what to recommend.  Each month I’ll be posting some of my favorite reads from our collection.

dark daysI’m currently listening to the audiobook of  The Dark Days Club by Alison Goodman.  I’m loving it so far, it’s perfect for those who have equal love of Jane Austen and macabre stories and demon hunting.  It’s a bit like Pride & Prejudice meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  It moves a bit slow in the beginning to introduce the reader to Regency England, but if Historical Fiction isn’t your genre this may not be for you. A good one for fines of Pride & Prejudice and Zombies.

For fantasy and/or adventure lovers try Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo.  Six of Crows is like a fantasy Ocean’s 11-esque  heist story.  Kaz Brekker, mast thief, takes on the seemingly impossible job of breaking into the Ice Palace with his crew of teen criminals. All the characters are wonderfully flawed, total anti-heroes.  This one is technically set in the same universe as Bardugo’s other series (The Grisha sixtrilogy) though you don’t have to read it to read Six of Crows (I didn’t).  Six of Crows is light on the romance and big on the action and violence.  At one point someone even has their eye plucked out and its fairly gruesome.  If you like anti-heroes and crime fiction this might be for you.

For the more serious reader, particularly fans of Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak or Jay Asher’s 13 Reasons Why I suggest trying The Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith.  wayThis one begins in Eden’s Freshman year when her brother’s college roommate and best friend rapes her one night.  Eden doesn’t tell anyone what happens and the reader follows Eden through each year of high school and how her rape has effected her.  This isn’t an easy read, but it is important in that it shows the effects of trauma and gives a view as to why a victim wouldn’t just come forward.  The book also shows how it can affect everyone around you and that we don’t know the reasons behind someone’s seemingly self destructive behavior.  I would recommend this one for older teens.

 

 

 

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